India Gailey concerts and workshop

Music by: Fjóla Evans, Nicole Lizée, Julia Mermelstein, Andrew Noseworthy, Sarah Rossy Joseph Glaser, Thanya Iyer, Shea Iles

January 25- 27, 2024 Allard Hall Room 11-363; Harcourt House 3rd Floor; Betty Andrews Recital Hall Tickets

 

India Gailey banner

New Music Edmonton is welcoming cellist India Gailey, recently named by CBC as one of “30 hot Canadian classical musicians under 30″ for several free and ticketed events January 25 and January 27, 2024

Thursday January 25 11AM: free workshop for composers and performers  Room 11-363 of Allard Hall (11110 104 Avenue NW, MacEwan University).

Thursday, January 25, 7:30 PM: improvisation concert with India Gailey, cello; Caitlin Sian Richards, viola; Biboye Onanuga, percussion. Harcourt House 3rd floor (10215 – 112 St, Edmonton, AB) Tickets $20/$15.

Saturday, January 27, 2024  7:30 PM, Betty Andrews Recital Hall, Allard Hall (11110 104 Avenue NW, MacEwan University).. Recently named by CBC as one of “30 hot Canadian classical musicians under 30″, cellist India Gailey presents works for cello and electronics. Free admission.

Problematica noun [ feminine ] /proble’matika/A substitute for a taxon, used for organisms whose classification cannot be decided India Gailey’s latest solo effort, Problematica (People Places Records, 2024) is a gathering of specially commissioned works that dissolve notions of genre into a psychedelic pool of sound. Layers of cello, voice, and electronics range from delicate and ethereal to distorted interlocking swells. The collection incorporates new music by composers Fjóla Evans, Nicole Lizée, Julia Mermelstein, Andrew Noseworthy, Sarah Rossy Joseph Glaser, and Thanya Iyer, as well as a new work by Shea Iles, commissioned by New Music Edmonton.

Problematica was made possible by the Canada Council for the Arts.

Artist

India Gailey is a cellist, composer, and improviser of “unparalleled talent” (Take Effect) based in Kjipuktuk/Halifax, NS. With a background spanning many styles, she has worked most often in the realms of classical and experimental music, including tours across Canada, the United States, and Germany. Recently named by CBC as one of “30 hot Canadian classical musicians under 30,” in May 2022 India released her second solo cello album, to you through (Redshift Records) to much acclaim. She is a member of the lauded improvisational quartet New Hermitage, and works frequently with living composers, filmmakers, visual artists, and dancers to create exploratory works of interdisciplinary art. India is the recipient of numerous honours, including awards from Arts Nova Scotia, Nova Scotia Talent Trust, the Canada Council for the Arts, and Acadia & McGill Universities. India loves raspberries, large marimbas, and the smell of burning thyme.

Accessibility

Betty Andrews Recital Hall, Allard Hall, MacEwan University – accessible building with gendered, multi-stall washrooms.

Harcourt House: Wheelchair access from the building’s underpass via the basement art studios can be arranged with Harcourt’s staff at tel. 780-426-4180. Gender single stall washrooms with handrails. Seating in the art galleries to be arranged with Harcourt’s staff upon request.

Artist photo India Gailey
India Gailey. Credit Jamie Kronick.
Back to events

Jan 25 - Workshop

Jan 25 - Workshop

January 25, 2024 11 AM

Free outreach event – join India Gailey for a free workshop for composers and performers on Thursday, January 25, 2024. 11-12:30  Room 11-363 of Allard Hall (11110 104 Avenue NW, MacEwan University).

Tickets

Jan 25 - Improvisation

Jan 25 - Improvisation

January 25, 2024 7:30 PM

Improvisation concert with India Gailey, cello; Caitlin Sian Richards, viola; Biboye Onanuga, percussion. Thursday, January 25, 2024, 7:30 PM. Harcourt House 3rd floor (10215 – 112 St, Edmonton, AB) Tickets $20/$15.

The Artists

India Gailey is a cellist, composer, and improviser of “unparalleled talent” (Take Effect) based in Kjipuktuk/Halifax, NS. With a background spanning many styles, she has worked most often in the realms of classical and experimental music, including tours across Canada, the United States, and Germany. Recently named by CBC as one of “30 hot Canadian classical musicians under 30,” in May 2022 India released her second solo cello album, to you through (Redshift Records) to much acclaim. She is a member of the lauded improvisational quartet New Hermitage, and works frequently with living composers, filmmakers, visual artists, and dancers to create exploratory works of interdisciplinary art. India is the recipient of numerous honours, including awards from Arts Nova Scotia, Nova Scotia Talent Trust, the Canada Council for the Arts, and Acadia & McGill Universities. India loves raspberries, large marimbas, and the smell of burning thyme.

Biboye Onanuga is a versatile drummer and imaginative composer based in Edmonton, Alberta. A recent MacEwan Music graduate, Biboye quickly became a sought-after player and has made contributions to the local music scene through series’ such as New Standards – a weekly show+jam centred around improvisation. Frequenters of live music will find Biboye hard to miss – whether behind the drums as a side-person at a concert, in the theatre pit, with his genre-bending hip-hop/jazz band Good Information, or every Wednesday at New Standards. Biboye strives to create unified bodies of work, that lean into the inherent ‘abstract’ nature of instrumental music. Ephemeral, emotive expressions of the tangible experience of moving through the modern world.

Caitlin Siân Richards is a multimedia artist based in amiskwaciwâskahikan (Edmonton) with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Art and Design from the University of Alberta and an Arts and Cultural Management Certificate in Museum Studies from MacEwan University. Her art stems from an improvised, intuitive process informed by her childhood, where she played music by ear while jamming with her jazz musician dad. With collage and drawing central to her practice, she returned to music as an adult when she started collaborating with other artists, working with sound, shadow art and animation. In 2019-2020, her animations appeared in Edmonton Public Transit Stations through a public art project. She spent the past year (thanks to support from an EAC Exploration grant) making paper and pigments from plant and recycled fibre, evoking cycles of transformation, regeneration and dispersal of memory through repetitive gestures; a labour-intensive process based on local ecology.

Tickets

Jan 27 - free concert

Jan 27 - free concert

January 27, 2024 7:30 PM

Program:

Julia Mermelstein – Bending, breaking through*

Shea Iles – pen and ink* (commissioned by New Music Edmonton)

Andrew Noseworthy – GomL_V7FinalMix_LessVox_MoreVerb_

Dec13_MASTERED_48k24b_FINAL.wav*

Sarah Rossy – I long*

~~intermission~~

India Gailey – Mountainweeps

I – glacial light fluttering in the wind

II – naked of an ancient watery sheath

III – leaking fauna and stones

Joseph Glaser – Joinery*

Thanya Iyer – Where I can be as big as the Sun*

Fjóla Evans – Universal Veil*

Nicole Lizée – Grotesquerie*

*World premiere

Notes and bios

Bending, breaking through explores a continual path from one state into another, focusing up close on what is in-between as these movements unfold. Sounds are stretched, suspended, and pushed into different folding and unfolding. What came before is imprinted into the new; no matter how different, subtle strands extend and emerge throughout these transformations.

Composer Julia Mermelstein blends electronic soundscapes and choreography into performances that create a space for introspection and the surreal. Her music has been performed across Canada and in the USA by distinguished ensembles and musicians such as Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Esprit Orchestra, Arraymusic, Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, Ilana Waniuk, North/ South Chamber Ensemble, Barbara Pritchard, and Blue Rider Ensemble. Julia’s music has also been featured at SummerWorks (Toronto), Impulse New Music Festival (LA), Vancouver New Music, NottNOISE New Music Festival (UK), Open Waters Experimental Music Festival (Halifax), CEMIcircles Intermedia Festival (Texas), and OUA Electronic Music Festival (Osaka, Japan).

Although the term is not limited to this particular combination, the “pen and ink” the title refers to is the coupling of simple, single-colour line drawings in pen with lush, watercolour-esque accompaniment in ink.  This process can be unforgiving, but the result in unlike any other medium in its balance of rigidity of fluidity. 
I imagined my notes on the page as the “pen” and India’s interpretive decisions as the “ink” colouring my music with their unique palette in their performance. There are stretches of long melodies which can be thought of as broad and structural outlines, fast and frenetic gestures as scribbly cross-hatching, and gentle, but energetic sections as a sort of soft shading. 
A special thank you to Ian Crutchley, Chenoa Anderson, and Emilie Lebel for making the presentation of this piece possible, and of course, India Gailey for their generosity in this collaboration.
Shea Iles is a Métis composer from Grande Prairie, Alberta. He graduated from MacEwan University in 2021 and is now working towards a Master’s Degree in Composition at the University of Calgary. His compositions often include references to art forms outside of music such as, film, poetry, and visual art.

Though this piece’s title may elaborately and sarcastically conceal it, Goml_V7FinalMix_LessVox_MoreVerb_Dec13_MASTERED_48k24b_FINAL.wav is inspired by hauntological elements, specifically those discussed by Mark Fisher in his book Ghosts of my Life. Even more specifically, the piece reflects my own connections with Fisher’s discussions regarding the band Japan’s track “Ghosts” and its successive sampling apparitions. The haunting atmosphere of the original track is only intensified when it unexpectedly emerges somewhere else as a manipulated and degraded audio spectre, and this piece presents my own explorations of this phenomenon. The piece is also a loose sequel to two previous works, Stacked for amplified cello and effects pedals and loss is itself lost for solo electric guitar. Both works present past examples of haunting atmospheres facilitated by amplification and effects processing, while the latter piece was also specifically inspired by Fisher’s writing, notably the concept of “lost futures” though applying it to interpersonal relationships.

Andrew Noseworthy (he/him/his) is a multidisciplinary artist whose music reflects upon the acceptance/rejection of “locality,” while addressing ideas of post-regional spaces and questions of accessibility for the musical voices within them. His genre-fluid projects coalesce wide-ranging styles and distinct artistic practices, while building sustainable relationships through communal collaboration. He is a member of the experimental hardcore duo this place is actually the worst (with Aeryn Jade Santillan), post-genre duo laydøwn (with Yaz Lancaster), Toronto-based ensemble ContaQt, and co-runs people | places | records.

I LONG is a grounding mantra to self that moves at the speed of trust and capacity. The piece serves as a gentle container for somatic voice work, ambient improvisation and thoughtful meditations on deep listening to the self.

Sarah Rossy (she/they) is a multidisciplinary artist based in Tio’tia:ke/Montréal whose work blends jazz, experimental electronics, and visual projections into ethereal soundscapes that are both autobiographical and socially conscious.

Sarah’s artistic practice has a core of music and sound, but has fluidly expanded out to incorporate interdisciplinary movement and visual projections. Mentorship with Meredith Monk, explorations of cultural heritage at the Arabic Music Retreat, ancestral research with the Arrivals Legacy Workshop, and residencies at Banff Centre, were all formative experiences which live and breathe in Sarah’s work.

Sarah’s rich collaborative history includes recordings with Patrick Watson, Thanya Iyer, NO COSMOS, Aaron Dolman, Jack Broza, and many more. In 2021, Sarah was appointed Artistic Director of the feminist choir, Chœur Maha, and accepted a role as a Professor of Music at Dawson College. Sarah’s interdisciplinary practice now includes education as a tool for social justice, empowerment, and transformation.

Sarah’s debut EP “The Conclusion” was released in late 2019, and a much-anticipated debut audiovisual album entitled ‘OF WHO WE HAVE BECOME’ will be unveiled in 2024. Sarah Rossy’s work is a unique and compelling representation of art, culture, and the human experience.

Mountainweeps is a set of miniatures for solo cello inspired by the impact of climate change on alpine environments. As glaciers continue to shrink, alpine plants and creatures migrate further toward the sky, which they will do until there is no ice or upward left to follow, until they are ghosts. Thawed permafrost and changing rain and snowfall patterns also disrupt the living things and their relationships. When glaciers are smaller or gone altogether, there are more landslides, floods, and avalanches. Of course, there are many more intricacies, many implications for humans and other beings who live among the delicate relationships of the elements. Beyond things living or non-living, I think mountains have a powerful energetic presence. They hold a certain kind of magic.

India Gailey is a cellist, composer, and improviser of “unparalleled talent” (Take Effect) based in Kjipuktuk/Halifax, NS. With a background spanning many styles, she has worked most often in the realms of classical and experimental music, including tours across Canada, the United States, and Germany. Recently named by CBC as one of “30 hot Canadian classical musicians under 30,” in May 2022 India released her second solo cello album, to you through (Redshift Records) to much acclaim. She is a member of the lauded improvisational quartet New Hermitage, and works frequently with living composers, filmmakers, visual artists, and dancers to create exploratory works of interdisciplinary art. India is the recipient of numerous honours, including awards from Arts Nova Scotia, Nova Scotia Talent Trust, the Canada Council for the Arts, and Acadia & McGill Universities. India loves raspberries, large marimbas, and the smell of burning thyme.

This piece is from my Interiority series which plays on multiple levels of the concept of “interiority”: on the one hand, each piece is made in collaboration with the performer it’s written for and explores some aspect of their interior life – in this case the score incorporates tree branches that India has up on their walls and the electronic track uses sounds from a soundwalk we took together in Montreal’s George Etienne Cartier park. On another hand, all the pieces also use the interiors of the instruments as sites for musical exploration and amplification – amplifying unwanted, noisy, and microscopic sounds into the exterior of the performance space. Joinery imagines the history of the cello from tree in the forest to log, to wood, to instrument – a process of destruction and reconstruction. The text of the piece comes from a scene in Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series where a sentient tree asks a sentient trunk if it enjoyed being made into furniture. In a way, it’s a great mindfulness question: Do we enjoy what we’ve become?

Joseph Glaser’s music creates space for performers and audiences alike to have out-of-the-ordinary experiences. Having had many years of training as a dancer, Joseph looks at composition with a choreographic eye leading to pieces that are as much theatre as they are about sound. Joseph holds degrees from McGill University and the University of British Columbia and has had his works performed across the country. Joseph is currently the music director of the experimental Jewish theatre troupe Michegas Theatre, the founder of the devised music collective Not Birds and the director of the Ontario Region of the Canadian Music Centre.

Upon talking with India on our shared journeys and themes we’ve been exploring, it was special to find connection on so many musical and personal themes. When India brought on the theme “in-between”, I realized this was something that I was living in as well. When composing this track, I was in a place of coming out of a deep burn out and was in that phase of searching for place, grounding, home and the feeling of being malleable and flexible again. But mostly realizing that maybe this place of in-between was somewhere where there was so much wisdom, and maybe it was a place that where we could find that feeling of being warm and full, as big as the sun.

Thanya Iyer is an enigmatic songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, band leader, and music therapist who crafts sparkling, genre-bending, experimental pop music. She grew up submerged in the art of South Indian Carnatic vocals, violin and dance. Thanya writes serene and spiritual compositions that empower listeners to embrace mindfulness, aesthetic beauty and the interconnectedness of all things. After her 2020 Polaris long-listed, sophomore visual album “Kind”, her band recently released their new EP, “rest” in the summer of 2022 (Topshelf Records). Through touring and performing, Thanya has brought her music to venues and festivals all across Turtle Island. She has also collaborated as a side-musician and recording artist with various artists in the thriving art and creative music scene in Tio’tia:ke/Montréal.

Thanya’s passion for being in community and sharing her artistic practice led her to musical creation with youth in collaboration with InPath in 2019. Since then, she’s worked in many different communities as an artist-producer and music therapist creating healing-informed, person-centered and community-oriented musical experiences.

Some species of mushroom begin their early life growing within an encasement called the universal veil. As the mushroom develops, they break out of this membranous enclosure, but remnants of the veil remain: found in a cup like form at the base of their stalk, and in little fragments stuck to the top of their cap. I find the idea that fungi live their life with biological markers on their being that remain from their earliest experiences to be quite interesting, and I am curious how this phenomenon might translate into music. Is it possible for a musical idea to roam through a piece while carrying around remnants of its past self? In the piece Universal Veil, I attempt to play with this concept by creating textures where a sound carries traces and halos of itself around the music, and by letting these traces and halos accumulate into something new.

Fjóla Evans is a Canadian/Icelandic composer and cellist. Her work explores the visceral physicality of sound while drawing inspiration from patterns of natural phenomena. Commissions and performances have come from musicians such as Grammy-winning ensemble eighth blackbird, the Aizuri Quartet, and the Residentie Orkest of the Netherlands. Her work has been featured on the MATA Festival, Bang on a Can Marathon, Gaudeamus Music Week, Ung Nordisk Musik, and the Cello Biennale Amsterdam 2020. Fjóla is currently a doctoral candidate in composition at Columbia University where her research is supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

This work is a four-minute operetta that takes its title from a perfume, which in turn is named after its inventor, Anaïs “Grotesquerie” LeGros-D’esquery. This perfume was concocted from liquified corsets, gunpowder and VHS machines. Her husband took credit for her perfumes leading to her leaving the perfume industry and secretly opening a speakeasy wherein she transformed the same perfume into absinthe. After a series of unexplained deaths, she disappeared for a number of years, reappearing as a costume designer for a historical drama film, where she constructed the costumes from all the resources she had on hand: reconstituted dried corsets, gunpowder and VHS machines. Another member of the design team recognized the scent of this concoction and revealed her to be the creator of the Grotesquerie perfume and absinthe. Grotesquerie again disappeared, never to be heard from again.

Called “a brilliant musical scientist” (CBC), and “breathtakingly inventive” (Sydney Times Herald), award winning composer and filmmaker Nicole Lizée explores themes of malfunction, turntablism, rave culture, film theory, psychedelia, experimental fashion, and thrash metal to create a new kind of expression.

Her commission list includes the Kronos Quartet, BBC Proms, New York Philharmonic, San Francisco Symphony, and l’Orchestre symphonique de Montréal.

Nicole’s works are regularly performed worldwide to international acclaim. Awards include the 2023 Music Critics Association of North America Award for Best New Opera, the Dora Mavor Moore Award for Outstanding New Opera, the SOCAN Jan V. Matejcek Award, the Prix Opus for Composer of the Year, the Canada Council Jules Léger Prize for Chamber Music, and multiple JUNO nominations for composition of the year.

Tickets