The No Normal podcast

Featuring interviews and new works by local sound artists. Hosted by Oskar Zybart

Episode Four: A New Year. Released January 23, 2021 Online

THE NO NORMAL PODCAST

This year, we’re anchoring our 2020-21 season with a monthly podcast. Hosted by local radio veteran, Oskar Zybart, each episode features an hour of newly commissioned works, discussions between the commissioned artists and a roster of guest interviewers. The podcast will also include feature stories, conversations with friends in other organizations, and much more.

Scroll down for artist and program information for each episode.

All of our digital events are free, but please consider donating the price of a ticket or a season pass to help support contemporary sound art in Edmonton! You can make a secure one-time or monthly donation through Canada Helps.Donate Now Through CanadaHelps.org!

Episode Four – A New Year (released January 23, 2021, features interviews and works by Rebecca Bruton and Lesley Hinger, co-artistic directors of New Works Calgary, as well as music and an interview with Edmonton’s Gary James Joynes. Gary’s new audio-visual work Sonic Suns (((GENESIS))), commissioned by New Music Edmonton with funds from the Edmonton Arts Council, can be viewed on our Vimeo channel.

Episode Three – Solstice Special (released December 21, 2020) This special episode of The No Normal presents new works by three spoken word and sound duos. We hope you will enjoy these extraordinary creations by Brandon Wint and Adam Saikaley; Nisha Patel and Ru Manyonga; and Dwennimmen (aka Shima Robinson) and Mustafa Rafiq. New Music Edmonton commissioned these recordings as part of its 2020-21 No Normal season.

Episode Two – Solstice (released December 18, 2020) features lots of conversation and new music. We have new releases by The Giovanni, bracing/ light pirate and Diana Tayler, all commissioned with funds from the Edmonton Arts Council. Also – don’t miss our first NME Commissions Redux, as we listen to The Break, composed by Jane Berry for UltraViolet in 2019. This episode includes those works, and interviews with each of the artists by Ian Crutchley and our new interview team members, Caitlin Sian Richards and Ainsley Hillyard.

Episode One – Welcome The No Normal (released November 14, 2020) Our two-hour debut episode features five newly-commissioned works plus a special series of discussions with New Music Edmonton Artistic Director, Ian Crutchley and local artists George Andrix, Rio Houle, Caitlin Richards, Bhuyash Neupane, and Raylene Campbell. Oboist Beth Levia and flutist Chenoa Anderson perform the works of Andrix and Houle.

Ian also spoke with New Music Edmonton’s outgoing President, Allison Balcetis about her ten years of dedication to building New Music Edmonton, issues in the new music world, and her own work as one of the key figures in the Edmonton new music scene.

Listen to The No Normal on Soundcloud, Apple Podcasts, or Google Podcasts.

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Episode One - Welcome The No Normal - Artist and program information

Episode One - Welcome The No Normal - Artist and program information

Released November 14, 2020

Listen to Episode One

Program

Llyn Deifiwr* by Caitlin Richards

Of a Vexed Soul* by Bhuyash Neupane

Pot – A sequel to Benjamin Britten’s Pan* by George Andrix, performed by Beth Levia, oboe

Siren Opus* by Raylene Campbell

Interview with Allison Balcetis

alone time* by Rio Houle, performed by Chenoa Anderson, bass flute

*commissioned by New Music Edmonton with funds from the Edmonton Arts Council 

Program Notes

Llyn Deifiwr: When the pandemic first arrived in Edmonton, I sat up every night drawing landscapes from my balcony as lit by street lights. As I began to notice sounds I hadn’t previously registered, in particular the distant train sounds from the Yellowhead and a loud unfamiliar hum that seemed to emerge from the sky on particular nights, I soon turned to producing sound drawings. The usually busy intersection within earshot was quiet and the occasional intrusion of a car sounded out of place. The long trail running by my place soon became a sound corridor for the trainyard. Later, staying with family in a quiet village, the train echoing through the basin of the mountains woke me up at 5:00 AM, resulting in a recording that I used for this sound piece. Being along highway 16 where recent protests along the train route and the Highway of Tears reminded me of the history of the territories the train crossed through.

When I was little, my second cousin visited us from a village near Newport in Southern Wales. He was disappointed that my immigrant Grandfather never passed on the Welsh language to his children and grandkids. He wanted to know what my favourite bird was so he could teach me to translate it into Welsh, hence the title of this piece. For years I remembered the translation of loon sounding like swoon differ. Memory of language itself is a sound corridor and the animation accompanying the train song draws from the strange, graceful motion of my favourite bird, Llyn Deifiwr.

Of a Vexed Soul, is a twelve-plus minute  piece consisting of three movements (the submission includes only the 1st movement.) that is being originally written for New Music Edmonton’s Series 2020-21 ‘New Normal’Of a Vexed Soul was fabricated by processing a series of samples sourced from my field recordings. In this case, the recordings had to be from the inside and around the apartment. The samples were acquired by mic-ing & recording the interactions with everyday objects around the apartment. There are three movements in the piece. Personally, I was so surprised and shocked listening to nearly 57 musical acts I had done within span of 2 hours. 

Throughout the piece, I have tried weaving together multiple phrases (of course in different time signatures) and as well as layer unanticipated polyrhythms in a solo section to confuse my audience (I hope they don’t). At the latter half, I might end employing those rhythms and tones to build organically to the climax of the piece. 

Why the title. “Of a Vexed Soul”? It was my communal attempt at expressing a musician’s heart and state of mind, and the way the ongoing pandemic crisis has affected all of us. As an artist, we take inspiration from everything that happens around us in our day to day life, but never while being stuck inside the four walls of our house. A house ain’t a home! Do I need to dig into the depth of explaining the fact that for us performers, the stage is our home. Of course, we still create music while home and keep ourselves occupied learning new music materials but we all surely do miss our home! Lets just try and understand the fact that with this piece I am trying to lament my confusions, irritation and hopelessness, but still music is music. And to listen back to my expressions, it feels good. Maybe for us performers, the next few years and the different aspects of performances it brings will be the New Normal! And we will have to grow our art that way.

Pot is a sequel to Benjamin Britten’s piece for solo oboe entitled Pan. Although it does contain a few notes of Britten’s work it is not musically based upon it  but simply a tribute thereto.  A pierce for solo English horn called Kettle, grew out of the solo oboe project.

Siren Opus is a study in domestic isolation, inspired by Campbell’s Deep Listening and acoustic ecology practices. The piece is a Musique concrète composition, using audio recordings sourced from Campbell’s apartment in Chinatown during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. The piece juxtaposes the intimate, internal sounds of the living space with harsh external sounds of people, traffic, and sirens. The listener senses the body, the building, and the comings and goings of first responders during a time of vulnerability and change.

alone time: “Liminal space” was a term popular on the Internet circa 2019/2020 used to describe images or memes that depict familiar or capitalistic spaces in states of dilapidation or failure which have been seemingly abandoned by people. The experience of seeing these images can be described as lonely, oddly nostalgic or off-putting.

The Artists

Caitlin Richards has a BFA in Art and Design from the UofA and a Certificate in Arts and Cultural Management with a focus on Museum/Gallery Management from MacEwan University. Her recent direction in hand-drawn animation and sound art stems from her interest in the relationship between the shadows and light of an environment. The process of using automatic mark making in her stop motion animations to convey the transformative cycle of decay and regeneration brings her back to her painterly background in expressionist semi-figurative abstraction. Her audio/video pieces have been recently shown at Mile Zero Dance, Metro Cinema, New Music Edmonton, Gotta Minute Film Festival, Fava Fest, and Found Festival. In 2017, Caitlin was the artist in residence at the Ortona Armoury, resulting in an installation inspired by Kafka’s Odradek. In 2019, she was commissioned by the Edmonton Arts Council to create a series of short video animations to play in LRT station TVs across Edmonton. Caitlin performs in the violin/viola duo The Olm and hosts the weekly radio show Imaginary Landscapes on CJSR.

Bhuyash Neupane is a multi-instrumentalist, singer, and rhythmic ensemble composer hailing from Nepal. As a performer of eastern classical music and a student of nepalese folk music, his attempt has always been to have music lovers witness cross-pollination of pure traditional performance art with electronica and ambient music, which he believes will help in popularizing electro-folk experimentation. ​Bhuyash has performed at numerous music venues in India, Nepal and abroad with various musical groups. He has been involved in experimental music collaborations with international artists as well as with local artists in Edmonton, and also around the province of Alberta and Saskatchewan.

George Andrix is a composer, violinist, violist, conductor, orchestral, and chamber musician who was a finalist in the Naumberg Competition (New York) in 1965 as a member of the Ithaca String Quartet. He has received Bachelor of Music and Master of Music degrees from the University of Illinois where he had the opportunity to work with such notable musicians as George Enesco, Igor Stravinsky, Aaron Copland, Paul Hindemith, Paul Rolland, Sir Thomas Beecham, John Cage, Max Rostal, Benjamin Britten, and Harry Partch. He also studied at the Trinity College of Music (London) where he as awarded the Ricordi Prize for Conducting. He has held the position of Assistant Professor of Music at Ithaca College (New York) and Morehead State University (Kentucky). He has also been on the faculty of Lakeland College and Grant MacEwan College in Alberta George currently resides in Edmonton where he spends his time composing, shooting flintlock rifles, hunting and fishing.

Beth Levia has played third oboe and substitute Principal Oboe with the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, and has played with several Edmonton based ensembles including the Alberta Baroque Ensemble and the Citadel Theatre Orchestra. A founding member of WindRose Trio, Ms. Levia can be heard on their debut recording “Path of Contact”, the 2009 winner of the Western Canadian Music Award for best classical recording. In 2015 WindRose trio performed a recital of Canadian music for reed trio at the International Double Reed Society conference in Tokyo, Japan, and in August 2016 they were the first Canadian ensemble to play at the Harbin Summer Music Festival in Harbin, China. She is a teaching artist at the Conservatory of Music at MacEwan University, maintains a private studio, and is an in demand Clinician and Adjudicator.

Raylene Campbell is a sound artist who has embraced various creative practices including improvisation, composition, performance art, sound and image, public intervention, and Deep Listening. She studied/worked as a freelance artist in New York and Montreal from 2000 to 2009, has a Master of Fine Arts degree from the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts at Bard College, and taught in the Department of Music at Concordia University. The focus of Raylene’s creative process involves explorations of acoustic ecology, psychogeography, computer interactive technology, and audience interactivity in both performance and installation environments. Raylene is currently based in Edmonton.

Allison Balcetis is an internationally-recognized saxophonist and former NME president who has studied and collaborated with artists from around the world. Her international performance career includes concerts throughout North America, Europe, Brazil, Thailand, and Taiwan. Recent projects include partnering with André Mestre to create Curto-Circuito, a yearly workshop for young Brazilian composers, which has seen the creation of over 30 new pieces for saxophone and piano since 2014. Other creative partnerships include Colin Labadie, Ian Crutchley, Nicolás Arnáez, Thierry Alla, Rodrigo Bussad, and André Ribeiro. Her work as a soloist and chamber musician has produced over 70 world premieres.

Rio Houle, who will be debuting “Alone Time” on the No Normal Podcast, is a student and a composer, born and raised in Edmonton, Alberta. He spends a lot of time in the basement, has a fondness for small mammals and reptiles, and always likes to share his weird dreams. Check out some of Houle’s work over on SoundCloud.

Chenoa Anderson is one of Canada’s leading interpreters of new music. Anderson is always seeking exciting new composers and repertoire, and has commissioned and premiered dozens of solo and ensemble pieces. Current collaborations include UltraViolet, a mixed quartet specializing in new repertoire; Mixtur with composer Ian Crutchley, performing experimental repertoire for flutes, electronics, video and found instruments; and damn magpies, a free improvisation sextet.
She received her early musical training in her home city of Edmonton, later pursuing performance studies at the University of Toronto (B.Mus.) and the University of British Columbia (M.Mus.). She is also the General Manager of New Music Edmonton.

Episode Two: Solstice - Artist and program information

Episode Two: Solstice - Artist and program information

Released December 18, 2020

Listen to Episode Two

Program

Soft with Sleep* by Diana Tayler

The Break (2019)** by Jane Berry. Performed by Jane Berry and UltraViolet (Chenoa Anderson, flute; Allison Balcetis, saxophone; Amy Nicholson, cello; Roger Admiral, piano)

Hello* by The Giovanni

Metacine2020* by bracing featuring lightpirate (Evelyn Delgado and Jeff Read)

*commissioned by New Music Edmonton with funds from the Edmonton Arts Council 

**commissioned by New Music Edmonton for UltraViolet Ensemble

Program Notes

Soft with Sleep depicts the moment when a dreamer awakens and looks into the eyes of their  beloved, evoking images of the dawn of a new day and the transition from a peaceful dreamlike state to awakening. In creating this piece my desire was to offer a soothing respite from any troubles or worries the listener may hold, and to bring something infused with joy and beauty into the world. Soft with Sleep was commissioned by New Music Edmonton with  funds from the Edmonton Arts Council. Poetry by Christi Retson-Spalding; produced and engineered by Keith Retson-Spalding; harp, whispering, glockenspiel – Diana Tayler; singing bowls – Charlotte Lusson  

The Break is a work inspired by a young woman and her experiences with Bipolar I. It specifically examines the period in time when she had her first manic episode and utilizes poetry that she created during this time. Additional elements of the text incorporate various phrases and thoughts that frequently punctuated her experience while the music itself traces numerous highs and lows, and contains within it various elements of internal conflict represented through dichotomous rhythmic and melodic figures that push and pull against one another throughout the work.

HelloEveryone is so far away now during Covid and so I used an old recording of my son’s disembodied voice to create an awkward moment that lasts exactly two and a half minutes

Metacine2020: As people who are generally anxious, once the pandemic hit, anxiety spiked. This piece offers a journey past another world flying in an expanse far from the germs, through the germs? Definitely away from the germs. We remember surfaces all so smooth that nothing can land, surfaces that never truly existed in the landscape that was waiting to unfold. We have been anxiously reading study after study, noting first how the virus can live on surfaces and how it can be suspended in the air and enter the body through the eyes. With an acute awareness of the particles swirling around us, will we lose focus on the waves crashing nearer and nearer. 

The Artists

Diana Tayler is a harpist, composer, and choral singer. Her music is inspired both by nature and the  challenges and beauty of humanity, and she strives to use her compositions as a form of  storytelling. Her travels across the country and abroad have afforded her many opportunities to  perform both as a soloist and as a member of musical ensembles, spanning from playing  keyboards at music festivals and night clubs to premiering pieces written for solo classical harp.  Diana studied harp with Caroline Leonardelli and holds a Master of Arts from the University of  Alberta in Linguistics and is in the first year of a Master of Music specialising in composition at  the University of Alberta. Diana sings alto with i Coristi Chamber Choir and participates in other  choral projects as they arise.  

Jane Berry moved to Edmonton to start her PhD of Philosophy in Music Theory in the fall of 2011 and holds a Masters of Arts in Music Theory from the University of Ottawa (2011), a Bachelors of Music in Composition from Acadia University (2005), and an After Degree in Education from the University of Alberta (2020). Since arriving in Edmonton she has become a prominent member of the local music scene and choral community, working in a range of capacities from professional singer and conductor to project manager, musical director, collaborator, educator and more. In her spare time Berry serves as a sessional instructor at the University of Alberta, sings with a number of professional ensembles, volunteers with local youth, and works as an avid composer and visual artist. Her compositions have been described as making an “impact that went far beyond the music-making” (Mark Morris, 2017) and she is quickly gaining a reputation for both developing and performing works motivated by a desire to use her voice as a composer, vocalist, and visual artist to increase visibility amongst underrepresented populations.

The Giovanni is an Edmonton-based artist who expresses in various art forms. In the past year, he has worked with Mile Zero Dance on Second Hand Dances for the Crude, Crude City and March of the Magpies. He has been involved in underground DJing, drum and bass music, experimental, and avant-garde soundscapes. He is also involved in abstract and graffiti based visual art, photography, and fashion design. The Giovanni’s focus in all media is authentic REALness and a unique expression. He is driven by adventurous curiosity and constant change.

bracing works with digital systems, loves exploration and the slowness found in the remaining wilds. This has influenced his compositions to focus on their own passage of time like an unfolding path, searching around the next bend. Documenting the obstacles that we face, modulations of the speed with which we can traverse. Grown out of selected musical historical narratives, applied through varied compositional and sonic strategies. 

Episode Three: Solstice Special - Artist and program information

Episode Three: Solstice Special - Artist and program information

Released December 21, 2020

Listen to Episode Three

Program

Longing for You* by Nisha Patel and Ru Manyonga

From Foreign* by Dwennimmen (Shima Robinson) and Mustafa Rafiq

Hunger, Prayer, Rot* by Brandon Wint and Adam Saikaley

* commissioned by New Music Edmonton with funds from the Edmonton Arts Council

The Artists

Nisha Patel is an award-winning queer poet & artist. She is the City of Edmonton’s Poet  Laureate, and the 2019 Canadian Individual Slam Champion. She is a recipient of the  Edmonton Artists’ Trust Fund Award. She is also the Executive Director of the Edmonton Poetry  Festival. Her debut collection COCONUT is forthcoming with Newest Press in 2021.

Ru Manyonga is a singer-songwriter from Edmonton who looks for inspiration from every aspect of life to bring soulful tones to the stories of her own life and the ones of those around her. Ru’s music takes on inspiration from Indie, Neo-soul, Folk-Pop and R&B music to give her the sound that she has today. At the start of this year Ru stood out in CBCs searchlight competition and was recognized as one of 10 soulful female artists in Canada. To keep up to date with her next performances and new music you can find her on all social media platforms @rumanyonga!

Dwennimmen aka Shima Robinson: Amiskwaciwâskahikan (Edmonton – Treaty 6) born poet and spoken word artist Shima Robinson embodies, with every poem, the ancient meaning of her chosen pen name. Dwennimmen is the name of an ancient African Adinkra symbol, which means strength, humility, learning and wisdom. It is no surprise, then, that this veteran of the Alberta poetry community uses a searing intellect and dynamic precision-of-language to create poetry which ushers her readers and listeners toward greater understanding and poignant reflection. 

Mustafa Rafiq is a sound artist based in Edmonton, Alberta. Their primary focus recently has been in exploring feelings connected with diaspora, gender expression and alienation. For this project, sound is pulled from bowed guitar, saxophone and voice improvisations recorded at home and sounds of endemic species & nature on the island of Jamaica. This opportunity to work with Dwennimmen finds Rafiq at the helm of production for the first time, providing a chance to flesh out the feedback heavy meditational spaces Rafiq craves to bask in.

Brandon Wint is an Ontario born poet and spoken word artist who uses poetry to attend to the joy and devastation and inequity associated with this era of human and ecological history. Increasingly, his work on the page and in performance casts a tender but robust attention toward the movements and impacts of colonial, capitalist logic, and how they might be undone. In this way, Brandon Wint is devoted to a poetics of world making, world altering and world breaking.

For Brandon, the written and spoken word is a tool for examining and enacting his sense of justice, and imagining less violence futures for himself and the world he has inherited. For more than a decade, Brandon has been a sought-after, touring performer, and has presented his work in the United States, Australia, Lithuania, Latvia, and Jamaica. His poems and essays have been published in national anthologies, including The Great Black North: Contemporary African-Canadian Poetry (Frontenac House, 2013) and Black Writers Matter (University of Regina Press, 2019). Divine Animal is his debut book of poetry.

Adam Saikaley is a Canadian musician, born in Ottawa, Ontario. His musical practice involves improvisation, experimentation, and composition. He’s a pianist, guitarist, and harpist. He has used dvd players, no-input mixers, and speaker cones as instruments. He works in both acoustic and electronic music, solo and collaboratively. He received his B. Music in Piano Performance and Sonic Design from Carleton University.

Episode Four: A New Year - Artist and program information

Episode Four: A New Year - Artist and program information

January 2021

Listen to Episode Four

View Sonic Suns (((GENESIS)))

Program

The Turning Larch by Rebecca Bruton. Performed by Rebecca Bruton and Swanherds (Rebecca Bruton – voice, epiphone; Zoë Alexis-Abrams – voice; Laura Swankey – voice; Ryan Driver – keys, voice; D Alex Meeks – saw, voice; Pete Johnston – Double Bass)

All I dreamt; twice as much by Rebecca Bruton. Performed by Quatuor Bozzini.

cute, meaningless (2019, excerpt) for violin, piano, and 2 melodicas by Lesley Hinger. Performed by Stephanie Chua and Veronique Mathieu 

Improvisation by Gary James Joynes – Modular Synthesizer and Voice Dr. Deepak Paramashivan – Sarangi and Voice

Sonic Suns (((GENESIS)))* by Gary James Joynes (please note that this piece will not be heard on the podcast but can be viewed on Vimeo.)

Warning: This video may not be suitable for viewers suffering from epilepsy or other photosensitive conditions. Viewer discretion is advised.

* commissioned by New Music Edmonton with funds from the Edmonton Arts Council

Program Notes

The Turning Larch No program note.

All I dreamt; twice as much This piece is fixed in intimacy, and the exquisite fragility of human contact.

Small intervals become a kind of touching between two or more players; close listening cherishes presence while time slips, continuously and unremittingly felt as loss.

cute, meaningless (2019, excerpt) No program note.

Improvisation this is brand new work from my studio just recorded on December 15th. I have chosen to share an improvisational excerpt which is a muscial study for a new commission by the Brian Webb Dance Company, which will premiere in the Fall /Winter of 2021. As part of his next ensemble Brian has also enlisted the talents of Dr. Deepak Paramashivan from Bangalore, India. He is an amazing musician, master of the Indian Sarangi and an expert in an ancient form of Karnatica chanting.

Sonic Suns (((GENESIS))) was created, composed & edited by Gary James Joynes. All sound visualizations created in studio by analog modular synthesizer programming amplified through a custom-built cymatics water tank. Thank you: aAron Munson, Larry Kelly, New Music Edmonton & Edmonton Arts Council. Note – this piece will not be heard on the podcast, but can be viewed on Vimeo.

The Artists

Rebecca Bruton is a Western Canadian composer, songmaker, and vocalist living and working in the Rocky Mountains. Her music deals with subjects of land, loss, and desire. As one half of the vocal performance duo Moss Moss Not Moss (with angela rawlings), Rebecca has also presented original work at Tectonics Festival Glasgow. Rebecca co-founded (with Alexandra SpenceTidal ~ Signal, a Vancouver-based festival dedicated to women and trans-identifying artists working in experimental music. Her song work can be found under the pseudonym F L O O D.

Lesley Hinger is a Calgary-based composer, arts administrator, and educator. She holds a Doctorate of Music in Composition from Boston University, as well as a Bachelor of Music from the University of Calgary, and Masters of Music from the University of British Columbia. Lesley’s works have been performed across North America and Europe by various ensembles, and showcased in numerous festivals and events. From 2011 to 2014, she co-directed the Acoustic Uproar concert series with fellow composer Heather Stebbins in Boston.

Gary James Joynes (aka Clinker) is an award-winning visual and sound artist that has been active in the international live audio-visual and experimental music performance community for many years. He blends the beauty and physicality of sounds auditory and visual elements in Live Cinema AV performances and in rigorous and emotional photo and video installation works.

Joynes is currently developing his next large-scale immersive audio + visual installation and film series entitled The Crepuscular Sound Ray Reflecting Pool ((( Sonic Suns, Sonar Winds, Wings &  Sound Beams ))) which will premiere in 2021. This new work will expand on his cymatic-based works revealing a new artistic vocabulary revealing the visualization of sound through liquids and projected light.

The most recent chapter in Joynes’ audio-visual catalog presented the award winning large-scale solo installation work entitled Broken Sound in May of 2015. Broken Sound was awarded the 2016 Eldon & Ann Foote Edmonton Visual Arts prize for best solo art show of 2015. His previous solo show entitled Topographic Sound in early 2013 showed his critically acclaimed work Ouroboros which had its large-scale premiere as a featured work in City Hall at the inaugural Nuit Blanche Edmonton Festival in September 2015.

Recent Live Cinema performances include MYSTERIES OF THE DEEP (New York), DAT CONFERENCE (Missoula), ELEKTRA16 (Montreal), INDUSTRY BRUNCH (Detroit / Chicago), CMKY (Boulder, USA), New Forms 14 (Vancouver), MUTEK_IMG (Montreal), NME Now Hear This Festival of New Music 2016 & 2017  (Edmonton), SoundsLike (Saskatoon), Koffler Centre (Toronto), Electric Fields (Ottawa), Roulette Mixology Festival (New York), Soundasaurus (Calgary), and MUTEK_10 (Montreal).

Previous years have seen Clinker’s sound and video work performed and exhibited in Canada and internationally in festivals and events including the The Banff Centre, Electric Fields (Ottawa)Mountain Computer Music Festival (Montana), Roulette Mixology Festival (New York)Soundasaurus 1 & 2 (Calgary), Soundfjord re/flux Sublimated Landscape / Sonic Topology @ ICA London (London, UK), Emmedia Sonic Boom 2009 (Calgary), The Banff Centre – Interactive Screen (2008 & 2007 editions), 2008 Leonard Cohen International FestivalTanzstartklar Festival 2008 (Graz, Austria), New Forms Festival 2007 & 2003 (Vancouver), Sprawl – Interplay_4 Festival 2007 (Amsterdam, Dublin, London, Bristol), Sea Of Sound Festival 2005 (The Works – Edmonton), MUTEK Le Placard Festival 2005 (Montreal), and Standart 2003 (Madrid, Spain).